With Meghna Chakrabarti

The companies that build our smartphones, our cars and our appliances don’t want you or your repairman to be able to fix them. And the “right-to-repair” movement is fighting back.

Guests

Nathan Proctor, director of the Campaign for the Right to Repair at the U.S. Public Interest Research Group (PIRG). Former national campaign director for U.S. PIRG’s New Economy team. (@nProctor)

Earl Crane, cybersecurity consultant for financial institutions, Fortune 100 companies and government. Security adviser for the lobbying organization Security Innovation Center. ()

Tom Schwarz, fifth-generation farmer, involved in lobbying for Nebraska’s state’s right-to-repair bill. President of the Phelps Gosper County Farm Bureau and has a seat at the American Farm Bureau.

From The Reading List


U.S. PIRG: Email Your State Senators About The Right To Repair

Washington Post: “‘Right-to-repair’ advocates claim major victory in new smartphone copyright exemption” — “The Librarian of Congress and the U.S. Copyright Office have granted American consumers and gadget repair shops greater freedom to fix their smartphones and other popular electronics in what ‘right-to-repair’ advocates are calling a major victory.

“In a new ruling that will take effect Sunday, the Librarian of Congress has carved out exemptions that allow people to legally circumvent digital ‘locks’ on devices they own, such as voice assistants, tablets, smartphones and vehicles, to repair them. Motherboard earlier reported on the ruling.”

Fast Company: “You may now legally fix your gadgets by hacking their software” — “As of Sunday, fixing your own phone is now legal even when it involves hacking the software protection measures on board.

“That’s one of several new exemptions to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act that the U.S. Copyright Office and Librarian of Congress granted this week. The law generally prohibits people from circumventing copyright protection measures in digital media and software, but every three years citizens can petition the government to consider exceptions to the rules.

“This time around, groups like iFixit and the Electronic Frontier Foundation successfully pushed for sweeping changes. In addition to repairing your own phone, you may now legally use software hacks to fix home appliances, smart home gear, and motorized land vehicles such as tractors. You can also hire a third party to make those repairs on your behalf and can unlock new phones instead of just used ones.”

Jefferson Public Radio: “‘Right To Repair’ Farmers Versus John Deere” — “Farmers are known to be a self-reliant bunch; able to plow a field as well as fix the equipment that does the plowing. Unless it’s not allowed.

“That statement requires some explanation: John Deere, the big tractor maker, wants to make sure its dealers perform the repairs on Deere equipment, and has the backing of some major groups and legislators.

“On the other side is the Right to Repair group, which wants farmers to be able to perform their own repairs.”

Resources For Repairs





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