As streaming becomes a bigger and bigger part of the gaming ecosystem, it’s no real surprise that peripheral manufacturers continue to push to own the space – especially with their flagship devices.

Thus, the Logitech G Pro X: a gaming headset that is intended from the get-go to be the best possible headset for anyone interested in serious streaming. What’s impressive is that for the most part it manages – despite costing just half as much as its biggest rivals.

Price and availability

The Logitech G Pro X is currently on pre-order for £109.99/$129.99 – an impressive price given that flagship headsets from the likes of Razer, Turtle Beach, or SteelSeries typically start from £200/$200 and only climb from there.

It’s due to release at some point later this month, alongside the cheaper G Pro – at £84.99/$99.99 – which offers the same core hardware but drops some of the software features and a few of the extra accessories.

The Professional

That ‘Pro’ in the product name isn’t just for show, and it’s clear that from the outset Logitech has designed this headset for professional streamers – and those aspiring to be. That explains both the headset’s strengths, and its few shortcomings.

Firstly, it’s clearly designed to look professional. The sleek black and chrome stylings look modern while still subtly drawing on vintage broadcaster headphone aesthetics. Very little about the Pro X screams ‘gamer’, and beyond the sheer size of them they’re headphones you’d likely be just as happy to take out and about with you – Logitech even throws in a cable with an inline mic for exactly that purpose.

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That’s just the beginning of the accessories you get. There’s a detachable boom mic, another braided audio cable without an inline mic (for use with the boom), an audio splitter cable for PCs with separate mic and headphone connectors, a USB DAC for the software side, a soft touch carry case, and both leatherette and cloth earpads – both padded with memory foam.

Basically, this is a setup designed to cover pretty much every possible use case or eventuality. This is one of the areas that the cheaper Pro headset misses out – it doesn’t include the cloth earpads, inline mic audio cable, or carry case, so is a bit less suited to the pro on the go.

You’ll also notice a lot of mention of cables – this is strictly wired-only, which is seemingly one of the few compromises to help keep the headset price in the mid-range. Again, that makes sense if it’s targeting pros, who would likely mostly use it wired anyway, but is an understandable downside for anyone simply looking for a premium set of cans to use from the couch.

Despite the size, the Pro X is super comfortable. I’ve used it for hours at a time without sweating up a storm, and the option of cloth earpads should help those who struggle with faux-leather. It’s also surprisingly light despite the sturdy frame, and doesn’t clamp in on your head too much either.

The Pro X can’t quite match the ‘feels like I’m wearing nothing at all’ build of Razer’s flagships, but I can’t think of any gaming headsets that offer better design, build quality, or comfort at this price – and that’s without even touching on the sound.

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Sounds serious

Naturally that pro outlook is reflected in the audio output too. Let’s take the core sound first. With 50mm drivers you’re looking at very solid audio reproduction here, and by default there’s a nice, balanced sound profile.

The Pro X comes with DTS Headphone: X 2.0 surround sound for additional effect, but either model gets you a rich, detailed soundscape that’s equally good for the punch and crackle of gunshots as it is the ebb and flow of music.

And that’s before you get to the USB DAC. Listen through that on a PC and you can use Logitech’s software to tinker with your EQ. You can not only save your own settings, but also tinker with presets created by a range of pro gamers and streamers in partnership with Logitech, to hear the game just the way they do.

That’s just the start of the sneaky software though. Even more impressive is the integration of microphone manufacturer’s Blue’s audio tech into Logitech’s own G Hub platform, giving Pro X owners a huge range of control over the sound of their own voice.

To start with, there’s a range of different mic settings you can jump between, designed to simulate the tone of different types of radio and broadcast. If you don’t like any of them you can go right into the nitty gritty of granular controls for yourself, with settings including a compressor, de-esser, and de-popper.

To make it easier to judge how things will sound, you can record a short audio snippet and loop it back to yourself before fiddling with settings to get live feedback on how your own voice will actually sound – whether it’s to get the tone just right on your stream or ensure your in-game chat is crystal clear.

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The software integration is fairly smooth, and you can make it as complex for yourself as you want it to be. Audio nerds can dig deep while if you’re less sure you can just apply a preset and be done with it. The only real downside is that this is all PC-only: if you play on console you’ll be missing out on a lot of what makes the Pro X special, making it much trickier to recommend.

Verdict

If you game on PC and don’t mind using a wire, the Pro X is almost a no-brainer: tremendous sound, comfort, and design for an attractive price point, paired with smart software that’ll have you sounding better than you ever have before.

On console it’s a trickier proposition – the headline features don’t carry across, and while the Pro X still feels competitive without them, it would be understandable to be tempted by one of the great wireless headsets you can find around the same price point.





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