After spending an intensive few days with Samsung’s Galaxy Book 2, we can see that it follows in the footsteps of the first-generation Galaxy Book that shipped last year by aiming to be a good value. It’s still a traditional Windows 2-in-1 tablet built around Samsung’s terrific AMOLED displays and rich sound, with LTE capability, a pen and keyboard, sold for a reasonable $999.

But the Galaxy Book 2 has also made some fundamental changes. Lured by Qualcomm’s promises of all-day battery life, Samsung switched from the Intel Core i5 chip it used in the first-generation Galaxy Book to Qualcomm’s new Snapdragon 850 in the Galaxy Book 2. Our preliminary tests show that performance suffers as a result. On the other hand, battery life improves enormously—up to an industry-leading 17 hours. 

In addition to the CPU switch, the second generation makes some other compromises. The built-in 4GB of memory and 128GB of storage is a bit skimpy, for instance, and the OS—Windows 10 Home in S Mode—might turn some off. As we work through more testing and file a full review, we’ll see if our first impressions evolve.

Samsung Galaxy Book 2 Mark Hachman / IDG

The Galaxy Book 2 uses a Surface-style folding hinge. (Here, it’s unfolded to show the keyboard better.)

Galaxy Book 2: Basic specs

  • Display: 12.0-inch Samsung AMOLED (2160×1440)
  • Processor: Qualcomm 8-core Snapdragon 850 (4 cores @ 2.96GHz; 4 cores @ 1.7 GHz)
  • Graphics: Qualcomm Adreno 630 (integrated)
  • Memory: 4GB
  • Storage: 128GB SSD 
  • Ports: 2 USB-C, microSD, headphone jack
  • Wireless: 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac VHT80 MIMO; Snapdragon X20 LTE Modem 
  • Cameras: 5MP front, 8MP rear
  • Battery: 47Wh
  • Operating system: Windows 10 Home in S Mode (Windows 10 Home as tested)
  • Dimensions: 11.32 x 7.89 x 0.30 inches
  • Weights: 1.74 pounds (tablet), 2.42 pounds (tablet plus keyboard), 2.64 pounds (tablet, keyboard and charger), as measured
  • Price: $999; S Pen and keyboard included

Galaxy Book 2: Build quality and ports

Samsung Galaxy Book 2 Mark Hachman / IDG

The Samsung Galaxy Book 2, tuned by AKG.

Physically, the Galaxy Book demonstrates that changing horses midstream sometimes necessitates a new harness and tack. Samsung clearly is aiming for good-enough performance this time around. The Galaxy Book 2 is a tad shorter, a bit wider, slightly thicker, and 0.08 pounds lighter than its predecessor.

The first-generation Book sported a chunky bezel surrounding the screen, and I was hoping for something a bit leaner this time around. No luck. Fortunately, if you’ve seen a Samsung display before, you know what you get: deep, dark blacks and rich colors—though maybe not as rich or color-accurate as the displays on Microsoft’s Surface Pro 6. The AMOLED touchscreen display pumps out a comfortable 329 nits of luminance, which will work well indoors and out. While the tablet isn’t totally sealed—a couple of vents on either side seem like some sort of new, strange expansion port—it is fanless. 

As for real expansion ports, Samsung leapt ahead to USB-C with the first Galaxy Book, and the second Galaxy Book 2 also sports a pair of USB-C ports. Unfortunately, Samsung wasn’t as thoughtful as, say, the Huawei Matebook: You’ll have to supply your own USB-A adapter if you want to connect to legacy devices. High-speed Thunderbolt connections aren’t available, either.

Samsung Galaxy Book 2 Mark Hachman / IDG

Two USB-C ports provide the primary form of I/O capability…

Keep in mind that the LTE slot also apparently doubles as a microSD holder, though adding or subtracting either a SIM or microSD card requires one of those annoying smartphone poky SIM tools to slide the drawer out. (We’re assuming that this is user-accessible; the plastic SIM tool Samsung provided bent easily and wouldn’t let us inside to verify.)

Samsung Galaxy Book 2 Mark Hachman / IDG

…even as the Galaxy Book 2 fully reclines.

There’s no Windows Hello-certified depth camera, though there’s a fingerprint reader on the rear of the tablet, right next to the camera. It seemed to have some problems reading my finger during setup, and I’m not sure of the advisability of placing a fingerprint sensor next to a camera lens, which could be easily smudged. Otherwise, though, it works acceptably.



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