Australians have adopted the smartphone has their favoured digital device for the first time, according to a new study. 

Emerging technologies research firm Telsyte has today issued its annual Australian Digital Consumer Study for 2020. 

The key findings are: 

  • Smartphones have become the main digital device for more than half (51%) of Australians for the first time; 
  • Australian households have an average of 18.9 connected devices, compared to 17.0 in the previous study; 
  • More than a quarter of Australians experienced some form of cybercrime in 2019.

Telsyte attributes what it calls an “unprecedented boom” in mobile subscription services, such as video, music and games, on the continued growth of smartphone ownership. 

Although Telsyte forecasts the average household to have more than 30 connected devices by 2022, an increase driven by the adoption of energy and lighting smart devices, security devices and smart speakers, it cautions that consumers are looking for more value. 

Our concerns around cybersecurity are growing, according to the study, with an increasing number of Australians experiencing account hacks, phishing attempts, ransomware, identity theft and cyberbullying. Telsyte also found that parents feel less equipped than ever to help their children navigate safely online. 

“Longer product replacement cycles and rising prices are starting to dictate market trends with consumers looking for new features that justify the increases in costs,” says Telsyte managing director Foad Fadaghi. 

Telsyte’s digital consumer study is a 192-page report covering a wide range of consumer behaviour and insights, from personal technology and social media trends to attitudes towards AI, automation and online security. They interviewed over 1,000 Australians. The full report is available only to subscribers, but Telsyte has released a few details publicly. 

In other trends, Telsyte says 45% of Australians agree with the statement “I trust less in the Australian government this year than previously.” The public report did not mention the thoughts of the other 55% of people surveyed. 

Telsyte mention that Australians’ trust in the media “has been shaken” with 1 in 3 “very concerned” about “fake news.” But the public report did not say how this compared to previous studies. 

 

 

 



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